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Patai is back!



Oliver Shambira



GOSPEL artist Madzibaba Ephraim Patai is back!


After

some time in the studio, Patai says he has finished putting final touches to a gospel album — his sixth — since he started his career in music in 1999.


The offering this time around is Handitsvagi Mbiri which carries other plug tracks — Hokoyo, Pfimbi, Zuva Nezuva, Ndokakurira, Vimbikai, Mapindwa Nei? and The Voice Of Prophecy.


Recording was done at a local studio.


Initially scheduled to hit the market at Easter, the album is expected out any time now after overcoming unforeseen hiccups that cropped up along the way.


Patai, a pastor with the Zviratidzo ZvevaPostori Church in Gweru, seems to have come of age if a sample of his latest project is anything to go by.


After bursting onto the musical scene he released his debut album Ane Nzeve Ngaanzwe, then followed it up with Shoko Seshoko.


These did not, however, do well on the market owing to a lack of promotion. But he was not deterred.


His fortunes changed as he learnt the ropes and dynamics of the industry. He has, like the proverbial phoenix, risen from obscurity to a top-selling gospel artist, spurred of course by his wife who has led the vocals on songs such as the ever-popular Mazambara.


He caused a stir on the market with the release of his third album Rumbidzwai in 2005, from which he picked Mazambara for a video. So superb is the choreography on the video that for some time it was a regular feature on national television.


Patai, together with his wife, is credited with raising the profile of gospel music, hitherto regarded as a solemn genre, to one of the most popular forms of entertainment and spiritual healing.


While some artists announce their arrival on the musical scene with a bang, only to fizzle out with a whimper, Patai appears to have learnt from those before him to ensure he grows his fan base and at the same time maintain his niche of the market.


On his personal verdict of the new project, Patai preferred to be modest.


“We have put all effort into ensuring we satiate the thirst of our fans. We have done our bit and now await their verdict as soon as it hits the market,” he said.


In his endeavours to spread the word far and wide, Patai and his backing group, The Voice of Prophecy, have on occasions played to full houses at venues in Windhoek and Oshakati in Namibia, thanks to a growing fan base that has fled the country in search of greener pastures.


He has been the pioneer of the Butterfly Effect, now a popular dance in gospel circles. Many now imitate but fail to match the master who at his zenith had his songs considered for awards in the most popular
song and best of video of the year categories.


With the latest album, Patai hopes he will not only entertain but convert a few more souls to the “straight and narrow road”.



After some time in the studio, Patai says he has finished putting final touches to a gospel album — his sixth — since he started his career in music in 1999.


The offering this time around is Handitsvagi Mbiri which carries other plug tracks — Hokoyo, Pfimbi, Zuva Nezuva, Ndokakurira, Vimbikai, Mapindwa Nei? and The Voice Of Prophecy.


Recording was done at a local studio.


Initially scheduled to hit the market at Easter, the album is expected out any time now after overcoming unforeseen hiccups that cropped up along the way.


Patai, a pastor with the Zviratidzo ZvevaPostori Church in Gweru, seems to have come of age if a sample of his latest project is anything to go by.


After bursting onto the musical scene he released his debut album Ane Nzeve Ngaanzwe, then followed it up with Shoko Seshoko.


These did not, however, do well on the market owing to a lack of promotion. But he was not deterred.


His fortunes changed as he learnt the ropes and dynamics of the industry. He has, like the proverbial phoenix, risen from obscurity to a top-selling gospel artist, spurred of course by his wife who has led the vocals on songs such as the ever-popular Mazambara.


He caused a stir on the market with the release of his third album Rumbidzwai in 2005, from which he picked Mazambara for a video. So superb is the choreography on the video that for some time it was a regular feature on national television.


Patai, together with his wife, is credited with raising the profile of gospel music, hitherto regarded as a solemn genre, to one of the most popular forms of entertainment and spiritual healing.


While some artists announce their arrival on the musical scene with a bang, only to fizzle out with a whimper, Patai appears to have learnt from those before him to ensure he grows his fan base and at the same time maintain his niche of the market.


On his personal verdict of the new project, Patai preferred to be modest.


“We have put all effort into ensuring we satiate the thirst of our fans. We have done our bit and now await their verdict as soon as it hits the market,” he said.


In his endeavours to spread the word far and wide, Patai and his backing group, The Voice of Prophecy, have on occasions played to full houses at venues in Windhoek and Oshakati in Namibia, thanks to a growing fan base that has fled the country in search of greener pastures.


He has been the pioneer of the Butterfly Effect, now a popular dance in gospel circles. Many now imitate but fail to match the master who at his zenith had his songs considered for awards in the most popular
song and best of video of the year categories.


With the latest album, Patai hopes he will not only entertain but convert a few more souls to the “straight and narrow road”.

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